• KO
  • EN
  • Minouk Lim

    {"arrow":"true","pagination":"false","speed":"500","autoplay":"false","autoplay_speed":"3000","loop":"false","slide_to_show":"1","slide_show_ipad_swpr":"1","slide_show_tablet_swpr":"1","slide_show_mobile_swpr":"1","slide_to_column":"1","auto_stop":"false","centermode":"true","space_between":"0","animation_swpr":"slide","height_auto_swiper":"false","direction_swpr":"horizontal","vertical_height":""}

     

    Mr. Eui Jin Chai and 1,000 Canes, 2014–20
    site-specific installation at May 18 Memorial M3 (former Conference Hall of Jeollanam-do Office) at ACC (Asia Culture Center)
    Commissioned by Gwangju Biennale Foundation

     

    Lim seeks to go beyond the overarching ideological binary that prizes fast modernization—where violence finds its expression—using assemblages of objects and through the intervention of places. After being informed about the “National Bodo League” (or “National Rehabilitation and Guidance League”), Lim began to inquire about the civilian massacres that took place during the Korean War. With support of Dr. Sung-hoon Han, a researcher of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Lim met Chai and resonated with his practice.

    Lim explores various modes of creating records, considering vanishing places and erased beings through dierent means of performance that may appear ritualistic. Since her ongoing piece Portable Keeper, which she created in 2009 as part of her Wearable Sculpture series, she has taken materials such as buoys, parans, feathers, and abandoned objects and turned them into the organs of her sculptures. In the resulting works, objects are embedded with performativity, allowing Lim to confront aesthetic and ethic dilemmas through them.

    In 2020, the canes are re-articulated and exhibited in a new display setting. They operate as the “third leg” and stimulus that evokes the notion of (non)being and (non)place and give relevance to the testimonies contained in objects.

     

    Minouk Lim (b. 1968, Daejeon, Korea) works in various media including installation, text, music, video and performance. Lim creates irony through performative forms that defy the definition and boundaries of specific genres. By exploring the conditions of our media environment, Lim’s oeuvre attempts to deterritorialize issues of identity and division aggravated by globalization. Her works employ a wide range of equipment, such as transportation vehicles, thermal imaging cameras, and broadcasting devices, in order to capture and visualize the speed, warmth and emotion of mourning. Her recent solo exhibitions include O Tannenbaum (ASAKUSA, Tokyo, 2018), Mamour_Minouk Lim (Tina Kim Gallery, New York, 2017) and The Promise of If (PLATEAU Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul, 2015). Her work has also been shown in group exhibitions such as Liverpool Biennial (United Kingdom, 2010), Istanbul Biennale (2007), Sydney Biennial (2016), Taipei Biennale (2016), Gwangju Biennale (2010 and 2014) and Busan Biennale (Korea, 2018).